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Steroid Injections in the COVID-19 Era

Does an intra-articular corticosteroid injection lead to systemic steroid absorption? Yes.

There is ample evidence that intra-articular injections of corticosteroids lead to numerous systemic effects. Most common steroids injectates can result in adrenal suppression for over a month. Accordingly, should a patient contract COVID-19 in the month following the injection, the steroid may continue to have a systemic effect.

The evidence for the use of corticosteroids in COVID-19 illness is limited and mixed. At the time of this publication, many societies in Canada and globally, including WHO, recommend against the routine use of steroids for the treatment of viral pneumonias.

The translation of this recommendation to intra-articular injections remains ambiguous. Whether or not the systemic effect of an intra-articular cortisone injection is sufficient to have an impact on the course of illness is completely unclear. Yet, given the uncertainty, prudence would suggest against their use.

If still unconvinced, another consideration could be the impact on the care your patient would receive should he/she suffer from severe illness. Currently, many novel treatment modalities are limited to clinical trials, and a recent corticosteroid injection may impact eligibility for enrolment.

 

What can you do instead?

Go back to basics! An evidence-based physical therapy program for arthritis is a great place to start, even during a pandemic. While many GLA:D programs are closed, information about their exercises can be found at: https://gladcanada.ca/index.php/what-is-glad-canada-2/. Many insurance providers are also moving to cover virtual visits with physiotherapists, allowing patients to receive customized treatment programs.

Alternative pain management modalities include ice, heat, self-massage, and acetaminophen. Of course, reminding patients that while a pandemic does not make it easier, weight management is the cornerstone of happy joints and a healthy body. A reminder that every kilogram of weight loss results in 4 kg off their knee never hurts!

 

Nitai Gelber, MD, CFPC

PGY-3 Sport and Exercise Medicine, University of Ottawa

Advisor: Dr. Taryn Taylor, BKIN, MSc, MD, CCFP (SEM), Dip Sport Med

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

BCCDC. “Unproven Therapies for COVID-19.” 30 Mar. 2020, http://www.bccdc.ca/Health-Professionals-Site/Documents/Guidelines_Unproven_Therapies_COVID-19.pdf.

Fascia, Daniel, et al. “The Safety of Corticosteroid Injections during the COVID-19 Global Pandemic.” AMSIG, 30 Mar. 2020, http://www.amsig.org/recommendations-from-bssr-the-safety-of-corticosteroid-injections-during-the-covid-19-global-pandemic/.

Messier, Stephen P., et al. “Weight Loss Reduces Knee-Joint Loads in Overweight and Obese Older Adults with Knee Osteoarthritis.” Arthritis & Rheumatism, vol. 52, no. 7, 2005, pp. 2026–2032., doi:10.1002/art.21139.

Russell, Beth, et al. “COVID-19 and Treatment with NSAIDs and Corticosteroids: Should We Be Limiting Their Use in the Clinical Setting?” Ecancermedicalscience, vol. 14, 2020, doi:10.3332/ecancer.2020.1023.

WHO. “Clinical Management of Severe Acute Respiratory Infection (SARI) When COVID-19 Disease Is Suspected.” 13 Mar. 2020, http://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/clinical-management-of-novel-cov.pdf.

Lower limb stress fractures in sport: Optimizing management and outcome

Stress fractures are common injuries in athletes and account for 10% of all sport injuries.  Ninety percent of stress fractures are located in the lower extremities. The risk factors related to stress fractures consist of the following: a history of past stress fractures, female sex, training regimen, footwear, training surface, and type of sport with repetitive loading (such as running and jumping). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be avoided in all fractures as they may inhibit callus formation and slow down the initial healing process.

In the management of stress fractures, 7 aspects should be considered:

  • Is the fracture low or high risk?
  • What is the optimal imaging modality?
  • Conservative versus surgical treatment?
  • What technique is chosen if surgical?
  • What optimal rehabilitation schedule if conservative treatment?
  • How fast can sport be resumed?
  • What preventive program is available for this type of fracture?

In all stress fractures, radiographs are the first-line modality and may reveal linear sclerosis and periosteal reaction prior to the development of a frank fracture. In most stress fractures, the radiographs are negative although clinical symptoms are present. When a high-risk stress fracture is considered and radiographs are negative, a bone scan, CT scan or MRI is recommended. MRI is highly sensitive with findings ranging from periosteal edema of bone marrow to intracortical signal abnormality.

Conservative management ranging from non-weightbearing with a cast or Aircast with crutches to limited weightbearing crutch-assisted without pain is usually the optimal treatment when possible, even in high risk fractures.

High risk stress fractures;

A stress fracture is considered high risk because it is located either on the tension side of the bone or in an area of limited vascularity. Therefore, they are at increased risk of fracture propagation, displacement, non-union or delayed union. High risk stress fractures should be referred to orthopedic surgery with immediate cessation of activity as they might need surgical treatment. Those include distal anterior tibial diaphysis, fifth metatarsal base, medial malleolus, lateral femoral neck, tarsal navicular and great toe sesamoid. These fractures require specialized imaging to define and quantify the injury. The location of injury and response to initial conservative treatment will determine whether surgical management is needed.

High risk sport related stress fractures include the following:

 Anterior tibial diaphysis:

In 85% of cases, the radiographs are negative although clinical symptoms are present which should accelerate the request for a bone scan, CT or MRI. Treatment protocols consist of conservative management for 3 to 6 months with crutch-assisted weightbearing until resolution of pain in lower grade injuries and of casting in higher grades of injuries. In case of failure of conservative treatment, then a surgical intervention is recommended. The return times to sports for such injury is usually 7 months for both conservative and surgical management. However, the return to sports rates differed with 71% for conservative management and 96% for surgical management.

An exception is made when a complete fracture line is seen with both cortices involved. In this case, the stress fracture should be managed as an acute fracture. If the fracture is undisplaced, conservative management is recommended. If the fracture is displaced, a surgical intervention with an intra-medullary nail is required. The return times for these injuries then increases to 11.5 months for conservative management and 7 months for surgical management. The return rates remain similar with 67% for conservative and 100% for surgical management. For conservative management, recommended rehabilitation techniques consist of activity cessation, with avoidance of heavy loading of the tibia, limited weightbearing with crutches for 3 to 6 months. For surgical management, rehabilitation involves a progressive weight-bearing program supervised by a physiotherapist starting the first week following surgery with return to full loading activities between 6 and 8 weeks after surgery.

Fifth metatarsal base:

These stress fractures present on radiographs as a sclerotic or radiolucent line at the proximal aspect of the fifth metatarsal. These changes can be absent on radiographs in up to 69% of patients for this type of fracture. Again, MRI is the second line imaging. CT can be used to assess if there is fracture union after conservative treatment. Treatment of these fractures depends on the radiologic “Torg” classification. Conservative treatment is now often favored except in high level athletes and in high repetitive loading sports (running, jumping) where surgery is considered first line. If there is delayed union (Torg 2) or non-union (Torg 3), surgery is also recommended.

Medial malleolus:

Radiographs can be negative in 55% of cases. For undisplaced fractures, they can be treated conservatively in low level athletes although a good evaluation has to be done as these fractures tend to contribute to long term ankle instability. These injuries must be followed by strengthening, range of motion and proprioception training with a physiotherapist to prevent ankle instability.

Lateral (tension side) femoral neck:

Theses stress fractures occur most commonly in marathon and long distance runners. They are not seen on radiographs in up to 80% of cases. This stress fracture is treated with urgent surgical fixation to prevent fracture displacement and associated risk of avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. A minimum of 2 years clinical and radiographic follow-up should be done to ensure that delayed post-treatment AVN does not occur.

Navicular:

These stress fractures present most commonly in sprint runners. In high level athletes, surgical management may result in faster return to sport time but some randomized control studies are still needed to confirm this.

Sesamoids (great toe):

These stress fractures occur most commonly in sports such as dancing, gymnastics and sprinting; all involving forced dorsiflexion of the great toe. Medial sesamoid fracture is more common than lateral sesamoid as load occurs on the medial aspect of the toe with gait. Conservative treatment is the first line approach. However, if the patient remains symptomatic after 3 to 6 months, surgery should be considered because of a high rate of delayed union, non-union and fragmentation.

Low risk stress fractures:

Low risk fractures are treated with rest and exercise limitation because of the low risk of fracture propagation, non-union or delayed union. These include posteromedial tibial diaphysis, metatarsal shafts, distal fibula, medial femoral neck, femoral shaft and calcaneus.

In the majority of low risk stress fractures, a bone scan or radiographs are sufficient and the x-ray can be repeated instead of ordering a CT scan or MRI. In the case of medial femoral neck, femoral shaft or calcaneus fracture suspicion, an MRI should be requested because of the possibility of surgical management or to exclude other diagnoses.

Medial femoral neck:

If a fracture line is more than 50% of the femoral neck width or is displaced, a surgery is required to stabilize the fracture.

Femoral shaft:

Displaced fractures, delayed union and non-union require surgical consultation.

Calcaneus:

MRI can help to eliminate differential diagnoses such as plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinosis and retrocalcaneal bursitis. These stress fractures are also difficult to detect on radiographs and may require surgical intervention if there is subtle displacement.

Metatarsal shafts fractures:

Among metatarsals, the second is the most common affected, followed by the third and fourth metatarsals. These fractures are usually treated conservatively with activity limitation for 6 to 8 weeks with an Aircast boot, short leg cast or fore-foot offloading shoe. Progressive return to exercise as pain allows can then be started.

In conclusion, it is important to remember that negative plain radiographic findings should not be considered alone but in conjunction with clinical findings. In the case of negative imaging with positive clinical findings, if there is a suspicion of high-risk stress fracture, additional imaging (bone scan, CT, or MRI) must be requested and conservative treatment implemented immediately for optimal treatment. If a low risk stress fracture is suspected, additional bone scan and serial plain radiographs are sufficient with conservative treatment, except in the case of femoral fractures suspicion.

In all stress fractures, independent of whether management is conservative or surgical, full level sport should not be started until there is clear evidence of clinical and radiological union and pain free ambulation.

Marie-Ève Roy, MD, CCFP
Sports and Exercise Medicine Fellow, University of Ottawa

Advisor: Dr. Taryn Taylor, BKin, MSC, MD, CCFP (SEM), Dip Sport Med

 

References:

Robertson GA, Wood AM. Lower limb stress fractures in sport: Optimising their management and outcome. World J Orthop. 2017 Mar 18;8(3):242-255.

Saunier J, Chapurlat R. Stress fracture in athletes. Joint Bone Spine. 2018

May;85(3):307-310.

Matcuk GR Jr, Mahanty SR, Skalski MR, Patel DB, White EA, Gottsegen CJ. Stress fractures: pathophysiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment options. Emerg Radiol. 2016 Aug;23(4):365-75

 

Choose Wisely – The Knee Ultrasound

Quick & Simple: Knee ultrasounds rarely have any use in the diagnosis of acute knee injuries.

Acute knee injuries are a common presentation in the family practice office. Depending on the suspected injury, the most common imaging modalities ordered are X-ray, ultrasound, and MRI. While the exact total cost of imaging is not widely accessible, the cost of each scan includes the technician’s time, radiologist’s report, and machine use. Thankfully, many acute knee injuries can often be diagnosed clinically without need for further imaging.

Knee ultrasounds can most reliably identify injuries to the external tendons and ligaments of the knee due to the limitation of the ultrasound waves from penetrating bones and thereby assessing deeper structures. This fact may appear confusing, as the radiology reports may comment on the meniscus and even the ACL but with very limited accuracy.

This is where an understanding of the literature becomes important. While some studies may report surprisingly high specificities and sensitivities for evaluation of deep knee structures, they often do not reflect true values for imaging done in the community. From our perspective as clinicians, ultrasound offers a partial and often unreliable evaluation of deep knee structures.

In conclusion:

  • Knee ultrasounds are most reliable for evaluations of quadriceps and patellar tendons, MCL, LCL, and bursitis.
  • While reliable, these diagnoses should be made clinically and immediate imaging is often not indicated.
  • While tempting, at this point, ultrasound does not offer reliable assessments of the meniscus and ACL and should not be ordered routinely for these suspected injuries.
  • Given our LHIN resources, knee ultrasounds should rarely be ordered given the cost and minimal impact on prognosis or treatment.

As always, if in doubt, consider contacting your local sport medicine physician for advice regarding which imaging modality is most appropriate.

 

Nitai Gelber, MD, CFPC
PGY-3 Sports and Exercise Medicine, University of Ottawa

Advisor Dr. Taryn Taylor BKin, MSc, MD, CCFP (SEM), Dip Sport Med

 

References

“AIUM Practice Guideline for the Performance of a Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Examination.” Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, vol. 31, no. 9, 2012, pp. 1473–1488., doi:10.7863/jum.2012.31.9.1473.

Alves, Timothy I., et al. “US of the Knee: Scanning Techniques, Pitfalls, and Pathologic Conditions.” RadioGraphics, vol. 36, no. 6, 2016, pp. 1759–1775., doi:10.1148/rg.2016160019.

Cova, Maria, and Emilio Quaia. “Faculty of 1000 Evaluation for Clinical Indications for Musculoskeletal Ultrasound: A Delphi-Based Consensus Paper of the European Society of Musculoskeletal Radiology.” F1000 – Post-Publication Peer Review of the Biomedical Literature, 2012, doi:10.3410/f.715297848.790852873.

Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome

Trochanteric bursitis has mistakenly been the diagnosis of choice in the past years to describe any pain over the greater trochanter. Surgical, histological and imaging studies have shown that most patients who receive a diagnosis of bursitis actually have “greater trochanteric pain syndrome” (GTPS) attributable to medius and/or minimus gluteal tendinopathy or tears, thickened ilio-tibial bands (ITBs) or external coxa saltans (i.e. snapping hip) with little to no evidence of actual bursitis. Two or more of these diagnoses are often seen concomitantly. In a recent study from the American Journal of Roentgenology, in 877 sonograms of patients presenting with greater trochanteric pain, 50% had gluteal tendinosis, 28,5% had thickening of the ITB, 0,5% had a gluteal tear and 20% had trochanteric bursitis.

A proposed cause of GTPS is repetitive friction between the greater trochanter and ITB associated with overuse, trauma, and altered gait patterns. GTPS affects patients between 40 and 60 years old, and predominantly females. Likely risk factors include elevated body mass index (BMI), overuse, and abnormal hip biomechanics.

On history, patients commonly present with lateral hip pain, localized to greater trochanter, which is worse with weight-bearing activities, lying on the affected side at night, side-bending and prolonged sitting. Hip and back pain commonly coexist. Pain can worsen with time and be exacerbated by falls, sporting overuse such as long-distance running or unaccustomed exercise. The ability to “put on shoes” can help distinguish between osteoarthritis (unable) and GTPS (no pain or difficulty).

On physical examination, the clinician should look for a standing posture with slightly flexed hip and ipsilateral knee or listing to the contralateral side on sitting. Examination of the gait should be done to identify an antalgic or Trendelenburg gait. Direct palpation of the greater trochanter has a positive predictive value of 83% (for positive MRI findings). Provocative tests that aim to increase the tensile load on the gluteus tendons used for diagnosis are FABER, FADER (flexion, adduction & external rotation) and passive adduction. Other tests that aid diagnosis and rule out other pathologies are the dial test (for capsular laxity), Ober test, log rolling, the impingement test, the internal snapping of the iliopsoas tendon and the straight leg raise. A combination of these tests should be used to increase diagnostic accuracy.

The differential diagnosis includes hip osteoarthritis, femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), lumbar spine referred pain and pelvic pathology.

GTPS is a clinical diagnosis however in recalcitrant cases or those with unclear history or clinical findings, imaging can be used to exclude other pathologies and confirm the diagnosis. Hip X-ray is useful as first-line investigation to exclude osteoarthritis of the hip, femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and fractures. Ultrasound or MRI of the hip is the second-line imaging of choice as it has a high positive predictive value for diagnosis of GTPS.

Conservative treatment results in 90% improvement for patients with GTPS. The main goals are to manage load and reduce compressive forces across greater trochanter, strengthen gluteal muscles and treat comorbidities. This includes weight loss, NSAID, physiotherapy, load modification and biomechanics optimization. Referral to a Sport Medicine physician might be necessary for cases that do not respond to conservative treatment. Adjunct treatments include modalities such as shock wave therapy and the positive results usually persist for 12 months post-treatment. Corticosteroid injections can be helpful in some refractory cases. Interestingly, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections showed clinically and statistically significant improvement in recalcitrant patients in a patient reported-outcomes study. However, more studies are needed to ascertain the impact of this treatment.

Surgical interventions are extremely rare and only for advanced refractory cases, failing optimal conservative treatments. Surgery can include minimally invasive endoscopic bursectomy, ITB and fascia lata release or lengthening, trochanteric reduction osteotomy or gluteal tendon repair. Often surgery incorporates a combination of these interventions. The functional outcomes of surgery are usually favourable.

 

Marie-Ève Roy, MD, CCFP
Sports and Exercise Medicine Fellow, University of Ottawa

Advisor: Dr. Taryn Taylor, BKin, MSC, MD, CCFP (SEM), Dip Sport Med

References :

 

  1. Speers CJBhogal GS, Greater trochanteric pain syndrome: a review of diagnosis and management in general practice, Br J Gen Pract.2017 Oct;67(663):479-480

 

  1. Reid D., The management of greater trochanteric pain syndrome: A systematic literature review, Journal of Orthopaedics 13 (2016) 15-26

 

  1. Redmond JM, Chen AW, Domb BG, Greater trochanteric pain syndrome, J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2016;24:231-240

 

  1. Walker-Santiago RWojnowski NMLall ACMaldonado DRRabe SMDomb BG. Platelet-Rich Plasma Versus Surgery for the Managaement of Recalcitrant Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome : A systematic Review. 2019 Dec 24.

Baker’s Cysts

The highlights:

  • A Baker’s cyst is a common swelling in the medial posterior fossa.
  • Commonly, it is secondary to an extension of the synovial space posteriorly, and accordingly will worsen with activities that will worsen a knee effusion
  • Given its prevalence and ease of diagnosis, imaging is rarely indicated
  • Treatment mainstay is addressing the primary knee pathology (ex: osteoarthritis treatment)

Popliteal synovial cysts are a common sighting in the primary care setting. Commonly known as Baker’s cysts, they refer to a swelling in the medial popliteal fossa.

While many patients are often distressed by their appearance, these swellings are benign. Simplistically, Baker’s cysts can be explained to the patient as an extension of their knee effusion. As the joint swelling worsens, a posterior extension into the popliteal cyst acts as a reservoir for the effusion.

The diagnosis of a Baker’s cyst is typically done clinically. It is typified by a medial popliteal cystic mass that increases in prominence with the knee in full extension and reduces with partial knee flexion.

The differential diagnosis for Baker’s cysts includes DVT, tumours (including sarcomas and lymphoma), and popliteal artery aneurysm. These diagnoses should be suspected if the location is atypical (ex: lateral popliteal fossa), the mass is firm or pulsatile, or if there is surrounding erythema, warmth, or tenderness.

Imaging, including X-rays and ultrasound, is only necessary if the diagnosis is uncertain or if another condition is suspected.

The treatment of Baker’s cysts typically relies on the treatment of the underlying joint disorder. For osteoarthritis, this involves activity modification, physiotherapy, and bracing when appropriate. When symptomatic, an intraarticular glucocorticoid injection may be indicated with or without prior drainage. As the cyst typically communicates with the joint, there is no need to target the cyst directly. Should this approach fail, an ultrasound-guided direct aspiration and injection of the cyst may be attempted.

Patients should be reminded that the Baker’s cyst is likely to recur as their primary joint disorder worsens and the effusion reforms. Accordingly, invasive interventions should be reserved for symptomatic cysts (i.e. pain and stiffness).

Should you or your patient continue to have questions or concerns, a referral to your local sports medicine specialist may be appropriate. A referral to orthopedic surgery may be appropriate following failed interventions for consideration of a cyst resection or joint replacement.

 

Nitai Gelber, MD, CFPC
PGY-3 Sports and Exercise Medicine, University of Ottawa

Advisor: Dr. Taryn Taylor, BKin, MSC, MD, CCFP (SEM), Dip Sport Med

 

References

Acebes JC, Sánchez-Pernaute O, Díaz-Oca A, Herrero-Beaumont G. Ultrasonographic assessment of Baker’s cysts after intra-articular corticosteroid injection in knee osteoarthritis. J Clin Ultrasound 2006; 34:113.

Bandinelli F, Fedi R, Generini S, et al. Longitudinal ultrasound and clinical follow-up of Baker’s cysts injection with steroids in knee osteoarthritis. Clin Rheumatol 2012; 31:727.

Chen Y, Lee PY, Ku MC, et al. Extra-articular endoscopic excision of symptomatic popliteal cyst with failed initial conservative treatment: A novel technique. Orthop Traumatol Surg Res 2019; 105:125.

Fritschy D, Fasel J, Imbert JC, et al. The popliteal cyst. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2006; 14:623.

Han JH, Bae JH, Nha KW, et al. Arthroscopic Treatment of Popliteal Cysts with and without Cystectomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Knee Surg Relat Res 2019; 31:103.

Handy JR. Popliteal cysts in adults: a review. Semin Arthritis Rheum 2001; 31:108.

Marra MD, Crema MD, Chung M, et al. MRI features of cystic lesions around the knee. Knee 2008; 15:423.

Torreggiani WC, Al-Ismail K, Munk PL, et al. The imaging spectrum of Baker’s (Popliteal) cysts. Clin Radiol 2002; 57:681.

FIT Implementation – Are you ready?

In preparation for the June 2019 roll-out of Fecal Immunochemical Testing in June 2019, the Champlain Regional Cancer Program invites you to attend: “FIT Implementation – Are you ready?” part of the Continuing Professional Development Series.

When: Wednesday, May 29, 2019
5:30pm – 8:00pm

You can attend in person or by webcast or OTN.

In person at:
The Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, Critical Care Wing
Room CCW 5225
501 Smyth Road
Ottawa

For webcast or OTN, details are available at www.cancerprimarycare.eventbrite.ca

Registration for this event can be made directly on our event registration site: www.cancerprimarycare.eventbrite.ca

Please feel free to forward this email and information to your colleagues.

This Group Learning program has been certified by the College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Ontario Chapter for up to 2 Mainpro+ credits.

Important Concussion Resources

In Ontario, over 150,000 people are diagnosed annually with concussion in emergency departments and by primary care physicians. In 2016 there were 15,736 concussions diagnosed in the Champlain LHIN. It remains evident that both healthcare providers and patients feel ill-prepared to effectively navigate the healthcare system with respect to concussion care and management of persistent concussion symptoms.

The Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation,ONF has been working to provide clarity and evidence-informed direction with respect to post-concussion care for healthcare providers and patients by releasing the Standards of Post-Concussion Care and the  3rd Edition Guideline for Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury & Persistent Symptoms for Adults over 18 Years of Age. Providers can use the resources to learn about up-to-date evidence-informed practices and recommendations. ONF’s goal is to streamline visits with healthcare providers and provide direction to patients and families to increase confidence about how, what and when care should be provided.

“Tennis Elbow” Treatment Approaches

Treating Lateral Epicondylitis with corticosteroid injections or non-electrotherapeutical physiotherapy: a systematic review

Morten Olaussen, Oeystein Holmedal, Morten Lindbaek, Soeren Brage, Hiroko Solvang

Lateral Epicondylitis is otherwise known as “Tennis Elbow” is an overuse injury of the extensor tendons that join the forearm muscles to the lateral epicondyle of the humerus. This overuse injury is thought to affect the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) specifically. This injury is seen in patients with either excessive repetitive flexion with subsequent extension of their wrist such as in tennis players, improper form and/or improper equipment or even with a daily profession that requires manual labour with their hands.

Lateral Epicondylitis is generally thought to be a self-limiting injury but can take a long time to resolve. Common treatments used by family physicians and doctors who deal with sports injuries include rest, NSAIDS, physical therapy, deep friction massage, braces, acupuncture, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, cortisone injections, surgery as well as more recently platelet-rich plasma injections.

This article looked at the benefits of two of these treatment modalities: lateral elbow cortisone injection and non-electrotherapeutic physiotherapy. The authors did a systematic review, which included 11 randomized controlled trials, representing 1161 patients of both sexes and all ages. All of these studies looked at least at one treatment group and one control group which included receiving anything from no treatment, to common treatments such as counselling, rest, or NSAIDS. Some of the measures used to evaluate the efficacy of the treatments were pain, grip strength and overall improvement effect at 4, 12, 26 and 52 weeks of follow-up.

Overall, the results showed that corticosteroid injection provided patients with a short-term reduction in pain versus control groups. However, more notably corticosteroid injections resulted in an increase in pain, reduction in grip strength and negative effect on the overall improvement at the intermediate stage of follow-up. Manipulation and exercise in comparison to control showed improvement at short-term follow-up, but no significant difference at intermediate or long-term follow-up.

In all, this study reveals that corticosteroid injections may have a significant negative effect on the intermediate follow-up likely outweighs any of the short-term benefits. Manipulation and exercise and exercise and stretching have a short-term effect, with some evidence of longer-term effect.

Dr. Mickey Moroz M.D.C.M. CCFP

Sport and Exercise Medicine Fellow, University of Ottawa

 

Advisor: Dr. Taryn Taylor BKin, MSc, MD, CCFP (CAC SEM), Dip Sport & Exercise Med

The Danger’s of Being a Weekend Warrior Hockey Player

Cardiovascular effects of strenuous exercise in adult recreational hockey: the Hockey Heart Study

Sanita Atwal, Jack Porter and Paul MacDonald

CMAJ February 05, 2002 166 (3) 303-307;

There is a well-known trend for adult hockey players of all skills to join recreational hockey leagues as they become too old to play in competitive leagues as they did in their youth. In Canada, there are more than 500 000 men who play in these leagues. The reality of these men’s leagues is that most of the players treat their one or two games a week as their only physical activity for the week. On top of this, they often only get about 2 minutes of light warm up as they get on the ice before the game.

This study recruited 113 male recreational league hockey players to see if this “weekend warrior” behavior had any negative cardiovascular effects on these types of players. In other words, to look at if doing high-intensity activity playing hockey once or twice a week without proper warm-up would cause a dangerous strain on these men’s cardiovascular systems. To do so, they looked at the baseline cardiac risk factors of the 113 volunteers (Table 1 below). As well, each one of the players underwent Holter electrocardiographic monitoring before, during and after at least one hockey game to assess the player’s heart rates, any occurrence of arrhythmias, ST-segment changes and for correlation with symptoms and other predictors of fitness.

When looking at the maximum heart rate the players reached in this study while playing, the mean maximum heart rate was 184 beats/min. General recommendations for healthy and safe physical activity in Canada recommends that the maximum heart rate that should be targeted during exercise to be between 65% to 85% of the age-predicted maximum heart rate (HRmax = heart rate of 220 – age in years). Studies have shown that anything of higher intensity causing the heart rate to go above this range can potentially to lead to an increase in frequency of cardiac events and sudden death. In this study, all of the players had a maximum attained heart rate higher than this suggested range of 65%-85% (Graph 1 below). Furthermore, the mean period for which these player’s heart rates exceeded 85% of the age-predicted maximum heart rate was 30 minutes. For 70.1 % of the player’s heart rates recovery was poor post-exercise. Non-sustained ventricular tachycardia was seen 2 Holter monitoring sessions, atrial fibrillation was seen in one subject and ST-segment depression in data from 15 sessions. However, of these patients with irregular heart rhythms, none had irregular follow-up cardiac stress work-ups.

This study suggests that the recreational hockey player faces an exercise intensity that can be dangerous to their health as seen in all the cases of this study. Even though each of the participants had higher than recommended maximum heart rates and some even had abnormal Holter findings there were no adverse events and no abnormal follow-up cardiac studies. Canadian exercise recommendations suggest at least 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous intensity aerobic physical activity per week, in bouts of 10 minutes or more. Studies have shown that engaging in 4 or more per week resulted in a reduced relative risk of myocardial infarction. Ideally, recreational ice hockey players as well as any high-intensity sports participant should be aware of these risks and should be advised by their primary care health providers to train their cardiovascular system gradually and regularly to be able to do this high-intensity exercise.  It is often noted that when we get older playing high-intensity sports is a privilege and not a right; to continue to have the privilege of playing hockey, these “weekend warriors” should be encouraged to integrate regular cardiovascular exercise into their weekly routine. When we are young and in competitive leagues, we practice on a regular basis to prepare for our games. As adult athletes, we must take the same approach of preparation for our games but with the focus on exercise tolerance as oppose to on performance as is the case when we are younger.

Effectiveness of Shockwave Treatment Combined with Eccentric Training for Patellar Tendinopathy

Effectiveness of Shockwave Treatment Combined With Eccentric Training for Patellar Tendinopathy: A Double-Blinded Randomized Study

Karin M. Thijs, Johannes Zwerver, Frank J. G. Backx, Victor Steeneken, Stephan Rayer, Petra Groenenboom, Maarten H. Moen.

Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, Volume 27, No. 2, May 2017

Patellar tendinopathy is a common overuse injury that affects the origin of the patellar tendon at the inferior pole of the patella. Overload of the mechanism leads to pain and dysfunction, and this condition can become chronic and difficult to treat. While eccentric training has developed a standard role in the rehabilitation for patellar tendinopathy, the role of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) is less understood. The goal of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a combined treatment of eccentric training and ESWT compared with eccentric training and sham shockwave (placebo) in participants with patellar tendinopathy over a 24-week follow-up period.

This multicenter randomized and placebo-controlled trial was conducted at sports medicine departments in a university hospital and general hospital in the Netherlands. Fifty-two physically active male and female participants (mean age 28.6 years, range 18-45) with a clinical diagnosis of patellar tendinopathy were randomly allocated to either eccentric exercises with ESWT (ESWT group), or eccentric exercises in combination with sham-shockwave therapy (placebo group). Extracorporeal shockwave therapy and sham shockwave were applied in 3 sessions at 1-week intervals with a piezoelectric device. All participants in the study were instructed to perform eccentric exercises on a decline board at home (3 sets of 15 repetitions, twice per day). To assess outcomes, the Victorian Insitute of Sport Assessment-Patella (VISA-P) scores, pain scores during functional knee loading tests, and Likert scores were registered at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 weeks after initiating the ESWT or sham-shockwave treatment.

 

The results of the study revealed that when comparing the ESWT group to the placebo group, there ware no significant differences found. While VISA-P and pain scores significantly improved over the study period, there was no treatment effect between the groups over time.

Despite being a double-blinded, randomized control trial study, the authors note several limitations in their work. The power analysis prior to the start of the study revealed that 56 patients were needed to detect a clinically significant difference in the VISA-P score of 15 points. Unfortunately, there was a large loss to follow-up (31.8% in the ESWT and 13.3% in the placebo groups respectively). Furthermore, the physical therapists that performed the treatments were unblinded (as they needed to adjust the shockwave device to “true” or “sham” treatment), and this could have influenced the results. With these limitations in mind, this study showed no additional benefit of 3 sessions of ESWT in patients with patellar tendinopathy.

Sean Mindra, MD, CCFP

PGY3 – Sport and Exercise Medicine, University of Ottawa

 

Advisor: Dr. Taryn Taylor BKin, MSc, MD, CCFP (SEM), Dip Sport & Exercise Medicine