Champlain Primary Care Digest

Home » Geriatrics » Don’t have to see it to believe it – The Effect of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scans on Knee Arthroscopy

Don’t have to see it to believe it – The Effect of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scans on Knee Arthroscopy

Don’t have to see it to believe it:

The Effect of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scans on Knee Arthroscopy: Randomized Controlled Trial Arthroscopy. 2007 Nov;23(11):1167-1173.e1

Multiple pathologies of the knee cannot be picked up on x-ray and ultrasound. Increasing prevalence of MRI has led to increased use. We as physicians may not see the bill for these investigations but they are still a considerable expense for our system. Due to long wait times, the National Health Service (UK) has started to perform MRIs to try and reduce the number of patients that will actually require surgery while in the US, they are questioning whether MRI will actually add value.

A randomized control trial was performed using 252 patients on a waiting list for knee arthroscopy. All patients had an MRI of their knee performed. They were then randomized into two groups; one had their MRIs read by their surgeons prior to surgery and the other did not. Even though the group whose MRIs were read had a diagnosis change in 47% of cases, compared to 1% in the control group, ultimately, the rate of surgery was the same.

Important to highlight that this is American data and they may be more likely to proceed with arthroscopy than their Canadian colleagues. Important to note that a diagnosis change occurred in 47% meaning information from MRI was still of value.

Take away message to consider: Don’t wait for an MRI report to refer to orthopaedics because it is unlikely to change the management plan in patients you suspect will require arthroscopy but still order the MRI as it can provide valuable information for operative planning.

 

Anthony Caragianis, PGY3

Advisor Dr. Taryn Taylor BKin, MSc, MD, CCFP (SEM), Dip Sport Med


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